The origin of Saint Veronica: Berenice, Judean princess

Summary In this post I speculate that the origin of the early Christian saint Veronica was the real-life Berenice, Judean princess and mistress/fiancée to Titus Flavius Vespasianus. I suggest that in the 80s CE, after Titus’s death, Berenice became a member of the Roman congregation …

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Matthew created Mt 8:5-13, which characterizes the centurion as a man of faith, in order to retain him at the crucifixion

In the Gospel of Mark, the author gave the Roman centurion the last word at the crucifixion: “Now when the centurion, who stood facing him, saw that in this way he breathed his last, he said, “Truly this man was God’s Son!” (Mk 15:39 NRSV) …

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I Corinthians/I Clement are not evidence for a church at Corinth

In Satyricon, written in the 50s or 60s CE, we learn that the famous Corinthian bronze was an alloy. The term “Corinthian” in common parlance could have denoted “mixtures” in general. I Corinthians and 1 Clement are pastoral letters concerning mixtures of doctrines. (See 1 …

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Sergius Paulus (Acts of the Apostles) = Titus Flavius Clemens (Mark’s world)?

Summary: Acts 13:7 mentions “the proconsul, Sergius Paulus, an intelligent man, who summoned Barnabas and Saul and wanted to hear the word of God” (NRSV here and hereafter). In other words, an elite Gentile, the highest civilian official of Cyprus, is interested in (proto-)Christianity. The …

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Why is “Thomas” used in the name of a sayings collection (the Gospel of Thomas)?

“Thomas” means “twin.” The name was used to designate the author of a sayings collection used by Judean/proto-Christian congregations. The meaning that first comes to mind is “identical twin.” But that meaning does not add any value: why attribute sayings to an identical twin? I suggest …

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